How are we to decide what to do with our time in a moral sense? What guides us? How do we know?

How are we to decide what to do with our time in a moral sense? What guides us? How do we know?

A friend of mine who I admire quite deeply brought up a simple question about moral epistemology. How do we know we are doing right and how do we discern from whom we should be guided? He writes, "I have zero way to verify if what they’re telling me is actually the true will of the invisible judge." Now, I'm sure some would simply respond "read the scripture", but that begs the question in favor of a particular scripture. One would need to first come to a belief in the scripture, but even then the variety of interpretations may be a hindrance. However, I think there is a path forward, guided by our current position in our faith journey, that can be reasonably agreed upon. People should only be held accountable for what they are able to do.If there is a best or set of best possible things a person can do,

he or she should do it.We can conceive of the best possible thing we are able do with our time (in the next 5 minutes, 10 minutes, hour, etc.)We ought to do the best possible thing of which we can conceive. Unfortunately, this leads to a difficult if not depressing conclusion. None of us really takes the time to think, "what is the best possible thing I can do in the next hour" and then actually does it. We always live our lives not only below what a perfect being might desire of us, but below what we know we are capable of. I think this ultimately sheds light on the depravity of humanity. We constantly choose short term marginal pleasure (a better coffee, a new video game, another drink at the bar) over maximal relief (charity for those in dire straits). I am doing this now in writing this post.

A common (albeit unsophisticated) objection to God has been whether omnipotence is a logically coherent concept. This syllogism shows that the objection holds no weight.

Does this age old question carry any weight?

God is omnipotentOmnipotent either entails doing the logically impossible or it does not entail doing the logically impossible.If omnipotence entails doing the logically impossible, then the answer is Yes and No , as God can violate logical laws like the law of non-contradiction.If omnipotence does not entail doing the logically impossible, then the answer is No, but this does

not impact his omnipotence because omnipotence does not entail doing logically impossible things. Furthermore, on the issue of whether omnipotence entails logically incoherent acts... God is omnipotentOmnipotence means "able to do all acts"For an act to be done, it must be logically possible.Logically incoherent acts are not logically possible. Omnipotence doesn't entail doing logically impossible acts.

This is a short syllogism that I wrote. If counterfactuals can be true, then it seems we have an interesting argument for the existence of at least a minimalist form of moral realism.

Whether morality is real or not has long been a subject of debate in Philosophy. Here is a brief argument I produced in support of moral realism.

(P1) If a moral claim is true, it is good to behave in accordance with that claim. (P2) Premise 1 is a moral claim

(C1) At least 1 moral claim (Premise 1) is true (C2) Moral realism is true This whole argument hinges on (P1). Can subjunctive or counterfactual claims be true?

This question is often posed by non-believers as evidence of an egotistical God. This is the syllogism I present to show why God, in being the grounding for Goodness itself, logically necessitates that he command worship.

Some argue that a true God wouldn't demand worship - why would he need it? This simple syllogism shows why an all good God would necessarily command worship.

(P1) Worship means to show reverence for or adoration.(P2) Reverence means to show deep respect for.(P3) It is good to adore, revere, or show deep respect for what is good.(P4) God is Goodness itself (Mark 10:18, 1 John 4:8, 1 John 4:16).(C1) It is good to adore, revere or show deep respect for Goodness.(C2) It is good to adore,

revere or show deep respect for God.(P5) It is good to oblige one's dependents to be good.(C3) It is good for God to oblige us to be good.(C4) It is good for God to oblige us to adore, revere, or show deep respect for God.(C5) It is good for God to oblige us to worship God.